Recent Storm Damage Posts

When Storms or Floods hit Lehigh County, SERVPRO is ready!

10/17/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage When Storms or Floods hit Lehigh County, SERVPRO is ready! Our highly trained crews are ready to respond 24/7 to storm or flood damage in Lehigh County.

SERVPRO of Western Lehigh County specializes in storm and flood damage restoration.  Our crews are highly trained and we use specialized equipment to restore your property to its pre-storm condition.

Faster Response

Since we are locally owned and operated, we are able to respond quicker with the right resources, which is extremely important. A fast response lessens the damage, limits further damage, and reduces the restoration cost.

Resources to Handle Floods and Storms

When storms hit Lehigh County, we can scale our resources to handle a large storm or flooding disaster. We can access equipment and personnel from a network of 1,650 Franchises across the country and elite Disaster Recovery Teams that are strategically located throughout the United States.

Have Storm or Flood Damage? Call Us Today 610.776.7774

National Preparedness Month: National Flood Insurance

9/21/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage National Preparedness Month: National Flood Insurance The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures.

The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners, renters and businesses and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.

For more information, visit www.FloodSmart.gov. Watch this short informative video, Why do I Need to Rethink Insurance?

This year (2018) the NFIP celebrates 50 years of protecting people in the United States against the perils of flood damage.

HURRICANES HARVEY AND IRMA NOTE: If you've been impacted by Hurricane Harvey, this page provides resources about how to File Your Flood Claim.

 

I Don't Have Flood Insurance--Why Do I Need It?

Use our interactive tool to find out how much a flood could cost you, and watch this short but informative video to learn more about the value of having flood insurance, Why do I Need to Rethink Insurance?

FACT: Floods are the nation’s most common and costly natural disaster and cause millions of dollars in damage every year.

FACT: Homeowners and renters insurance does not typically cover flood damage.

FACT: Floods can happen anywhere--More than 20 percent of flood claims come from properties outside the high risk flood zone. Check out The Big Cost of Flooding.

FACT: Flood insurance can pay regardless of whether or not there is a Presidential Disaster Declaration.

FACT: Most federal disaster assistance comes in the form of low-interest disaster loans from U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and you have to pay them back. FEMA offers disaster grants that don't need to be paid back, but this amount is often much less than what is needed to recover. A claim against your flood insurance policy could and often does, provide more funds for recovery than those you could qualify for from FEMA or the SBA--and you don't have to pay it back.

FACT: You may be required to have flood insurance. Congress has mandated federally regulated or insured lenders to require flood insurance on mortgaged properties that are located in areas at high risk of flooding. But even if your property is not in a high risk flood area, your mortgage lender may still require you to have flood insurance.

Flood insurance helps more: Check out your state's flood history with FEMA's interactive data visualization tool. Roll your cursor over each county to see how many flooding events have happened. The tool allows you to compare how much FEMA and the U.S. Small Business Administration have provided in terms of federal disaster aid after Presidential Disaster Declarations to the amount the National Flood Insurance program has paid to its policyholders. It's easy to see that having flood insurance provides a lot more help for recovery.

I Have Flood Insurance--Do I Really Need To Keep It?

You realize your flood insurance policy is about to expire and you’re on the fence about renewing: It hasn’t flooded in your area in years (or ever). And you really could use that extra money to buy something you really want. Watch this short, informative video, Why Do I Need to Rethink Insurance?

But wait!

DON’T. RISK. IT.

FACT: Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States, affecting every region and state, including yours.

FACT: Flood insurance can be the difference between recovering and being financially devastated.

FACT: The damage from just one inch of water can cost more than $20,000. Check out The Big Cost of Flooding.

FACT: You may be required to have flood insurance. Congress has mandated federally regulated or insured lenders to require flood insurance on mortgaged properties that are located in areas at high risk of flooding. But even if your property is not in a high-risk flood area, your mortgage lender may still require you to have flood insurance.

FACT: If you allow your flood insurance policy to lapse for either more than 90 days, or twice for any number of days, you may be required to provide an Elevation Certificate (if you don't have one), and you may no longer be eligible for policy rate discounts you might have been receiving prior to the policy lapse. It's important to talk with your insurance agent before canceling or not renewing the policy.

FACT: You can file a flood claim even if there is not a Presidential Disaster Declaration.

FACT: Flood damage is not typically covered by homeowners insurance.

FACT: No home is completely safe from potential flooding devastation—why risk it?

FACT: If you live in a high risk flood zone, and you've received federal disaster assistance in the form of grants from FEMA or low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) following a Presidential Disaster Declaration, you must maintain flood insurance in order to be considered for any future federal disaster aid.

FACT: Storms are not the only cause of floods. Flooding can be caused by dams or levees breaking, new development changing how water flows above and below ground, snowmelt and much more.

FACT: Too often, Americans are caught off guard by the emotional and financial costs of flood damage.

Flood insurance helps more: Check out your state's flood history with FEMA's interactive data Visualization Tool. Roll your cursor over each county to see how many flooding events have happened. The tool allows you to compare how much FEMA has provided in terms of federal disaster aid (through its Individuals & Households Program) after Presidential Disaster Declarations to the amount the National Flood Insurance Program has paid to its policyholders. It's easy to see having flood insurance provides a lot more help for recovery.

To renew your policy, call your flood insurance agent. If you don’t have your insurance agent’s contact information, call the National Flood Insurance Program’s Help Center at 1-800-427-4661.

Who Can Buy Flood Insurance?

If you are a renter or homeowner (residential policy); or business owner (non-residential policy) and your property is located in a NFIP-participating community, you can purchase a policy. Contact your insurance agent to find out if your community participates in the National Flood Insurance Program.

Flood insurance from the NFIP is only available in participating communities. Ask your agent if your state and community participate, or look it up online in the Community Status Book.

Learn more by watching these short videos, What Do I Need To Know About Flood Insurance Coverage? and How Can I Buy Flood Insurance?

How Can I Buy Flood Insurance?

Find an insurance agent near you. The agent who helps you with your homeowners or renters insurance may be able to help you with purchasing flood insurance too.

You can only purchase flood insurance through an insurance agent; you cannot buy it directly from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). If your insurance agent does not sell flood insurance, you can:

  • Contact the National Flood Insurance Program’s Help Center at 1-800-427-4661 to request an agent referral.
  • Watch this informative video, How Can I Buy Flood Insurance?

What Do I Need To Know When I Buy A Flood Insurance Policy?

How Do I Renew, Change Or Pay For My Flood Insurance Policy?

Your flood insurance agent can help you make changes to, pay for, or renew your flood policy. If your lender requires you to have flood insurance, contact them directly to ask questions about renewing or changing your policy. Your payments could be included in financial transactions associated with your mortgage.

My Question Is About Flood Maps--What Should I Do?

Find out if your community has a recent or upcoming flood map change. When your community’s  flood map is updated to reflect the current risks where you live, requirements for flood insurance coverage and the costs of your policy can also change.

Find your community’s flood map (Type in your address and choose "Interactive Map")

Get answers to your flood mapping questions online or by talking with someone from FEMA’s Map Service Center.

Request a review of your flood zone designation (If you believe the zone your insurer or lender has determined for your property is incorrect.)

What Should I Know And Do Before, During And After A Flood?

The National Flood Insurance Program Desk Reference is in three distinct sections:

  • Before the Flood
  • During the Flood, and
  • After the Flood

Community and state leaders, insurance industry professionals, as well as policyholders, renters, homeowners and businesses will find its resources helpful. We have organized this guide to provide succinct information in an easy-to-navigate document and included important, key contact information. To ensure it can be updated as the program evolves, this document has been published electronically.

Read about everything from mitigating your home to reduce flood damage, to information about weather alerts and how to stay safe when it's flooding in, How to Prepare for a Flood.

Information for Policyholders, Help with or without a Disaster Declaration.

My Home Or Business Just Flooded--What Should I Do?

File Your Flood Claim

Flood claim appeals and guidance (please note--you cannot appeal a claim until you receive a denial [for some or all of your claim amount] from your insurance company.)

What Can I Do To Prepare For Or Even Reduce Flood Damage? And Can Doing These Things Lessen How Much I Pay For Flood Insurance?

What you pay for flood insurance has a lot to do with how much flood risk is associated with your building. It makes sense to reduce flood risk no matter what, but in some instances reducing flood risk can also lead to lower flood insurance costs. Below are some resources to help, but discussing your policy options with your insurance agent is the best place to start.

Reducing Flood Risk to Residential Buildings that Cannot be Elevated explains things that can be done to better protect a building from flood damage, and in some cases implementing these changes will reduce the cost of your flood insurance.

Communities enrolled in the NFIP's Community Rating System can get discounts on their flood insurance, learn more here.

The Homeowner's Guide to Retrofitting can help you decide the right method to mitigate future damage and loss by considering various factors, such as hazards to your home, permit requirements, technical limitations, and costs. This guide also helps you develop a flood protection strategy.

The Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage, for eligible properties that are required to be in compliance with local floodplain requirements, can help pay for elevating a building after a flood. Another way to get help with the cost of elevating your building would be through one of FEMA's various grant programs. The grants are administered by states, and each state decides which projects it will fund and for how much. Contact your local floodplain manager for more information.

To learn more about elevating your property, read Elevating Your House.

Did you know? An elevated home, like the one shown on the 5 Ways to Lower Your Flood Insurance Premium, with a first floor elevated 3 feet above the base ­flood elevation, can expect to save 60 percent or more on annual ­flood insurance premiums.

Did you know? Elevating just one foot above the Base Flood Elevation often results in a 30% reduction in annual premiums.

Source: Ready.gov

National Preparedness Month: How to file a flood claim

9/19/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage National Preparedness Month: How to file a flood claim Collect all documents and protect them in a safe place in case of a flood!
How Do I File My Flood Claim?

It can be a very overwhelming time for a property owner or renter following a flood. The information below will provide you with what you need to know about filing a flood insurance claim, tips on what you can do and need to know before your flood insurance adjuster visits your property and the other visitors you can expect at your property. The more you know, the smoother the process will go.

You should report your loss immediately to your insurance agent or insurance carrier and ask them about Advance Payments.

Find your insurer on this list of insurance companies administering National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) flood insurance and report your claim right away. If you need assistance finding your insurance carrier, please call 800-427-4661. Help is available in most languages. Individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing can use TTY 800-462-7585.

If you have a policy written directly with the NFIP (i.e., your Declaration Page has the FEMA logo in the top corner), it's fast and easy to report your claim directly to the NFIP's Direct Servicing Agent.

You should have the following information available when reporting your claim:

  • Policy Declarations page (official document detailing your flood insurance coverage), if available
  • How you can be reached: telephone number or alternate contact number and email address
  • The insured property location
  • The name of any mortgage company(s)

A claims adjuster should contact you within 24-48 hours, but it may take longer, depending on the severity of the flood event.

NOTE: Your NFIP policy does not cover Additional Living Expenses, including temporary housing, but if you qualify, FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program might be able to help. So, it’s important to register for assistance with FEMA, even if you have flood insurance.

Registering online, at DisasterAssistance.gov is the quickest way to register for FEMA assistance. If you do not have access to the internet, you may register by calling 800-621-3362 or TTY 800-462-7585. If you use 711 relay or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 800-621-3362 directly. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice.

NFIP policyholders must follow the guidelines of their flood policy when cleaning up. Read the U.S. Department of Environmental Protection Agency’s Homeowner’s and Renter’s Guide to Mold Cleanup After Disasters.

Before entering a flooded building, make sure it’s safe.

Take as many photos and/or videos of your flood-damaged property as you can, both on the outside and the inside of the building, and label them, by room, before you remove anything—including items of exceptional value. For items like washers and dryers, hot water heaters, kitchen appliances, televisions and computers, make sure you take a photograph of the make, model and serial number. This information should be provided to your adjuster.

Remove your flood damaged items:

  1. For your building items (e.g., flooring), retain samples such as carpet, wallpaper and drapes for your adjuster’s inspection.
  2. For your personal property items, separate the damaged from undamaged items for your adjuster’s inspection.
  3. Immediately throw away flooded items that pose a health risk, such as perishable food, clothing, cushions and pillows, after photographing them.
  4. Confirm your available NFIP coverage. Some policyholders may only have building or contents (personal property items) coverage, not both.
  5. Contact repair services if the building’s electrical, water or HVAC systems are damaged. It’s important to consult your adjuster or insurance carrier before you sign any agreement/contract with a cleaning, remediation or maintenance contractor.
  6. Contact your community building department and floodplain administrator to get the following information:
  7. Whether your property was substantially damaged;
  8. Tips on how to better protect or repair your home; and
  9. How to obtain a building permit. This is a very important step to ensure you are rebuilding in compliance with local ordinances.

When your claims adjuster arrives, he/she should show you their official identification (Driver’s License and Company ID or Flood Control Number (FCN card)). The adjuster should also provide you with their contact information, such as their name, email, phone number, the name of their adjusting firm and their telephone number.

What you should expect from your adjuster:

  • An explanation of the NFIP Flood Claims Process.
  • An inspection of your property—during which he/she will scope your loss by taking measurements and photos.
  • An explanation of what an Advance Payment is and how, or if, you can get one.
  • Information about how you should present your loss to your insurance carrier, and a discussion about your policy coverage.

Other things to know, do and/or discuss with your adjuster:

  • The insurance carrier, not the adjuster, has the authority to approve your claim.
  • Be sure to provide your current mailing address and phone number if you are displaced.
  • Ask if you are eligible for Increased Cost of Compliance.
  • The adjuster should never ask you for money or collect your deductible amount.

At the end of your inspection, your adjuster should provide you with information about what you need to do and what will happen next. The adjuster should hand you a physical copy of this information along with his/her contact information. Read more about what to do after your inspection.

Your adjuster may assist you in preparing a Proof of Loss (your sworn statement of the amount you are claiming, including necessary supporting documentation) for your official claim for damage. A Proof of Loss can be many things, but must contain the specific details set forth in the Standard Flood Insurance Policy. You'll need to file your Proof of Loss with your insurance company within 60 days of the date of loss.

You'll receive your claim payment after you and the insurer agree on the amount of damage and the insurer has your complete and signed Proof of Loss. If major catastrophic flooding occurs, it may take longer to process claims.

Note: Signing a Proof of Loss does not waive your rights to file for additional claim payments in the future if additional damage is discovered.

Note: The requirement to file the Proof of Loss could be waived by FEMA depending on the severity of the event. Your adjuster or insurance company will let you know if this happens.

Source: Floodsmart.gov

National Preparedness Month: Flood Insurance

9/11/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage National Preparedness Month: Flood Insurance Don't wait until it's too late to get flood insurance!

How Do I Buy Flood Insurance?

National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) policies can be purchased through thousands of insurance agents nationwide. The agent who helps you with your homeowners or renters insurance may also be able to help you with purchasing flood insurance. Here is a list of participating Write Your Own (WYO) companies.

If your insurance agent does not sell flood insurance, you can contact the NFIP Help Center at 800-427-4661. NFIP flood insurance policies can only be purchased for properties within communities that participate in the NFIP. Ask your agent if your community participates, or look it up online in the Community Status Book.

  Why Buy Flood Insurance

No home is completely safe from potential flooding. Flood insurance can be the difference between recovering and being financially devastated. Just one inch of water in a home can cost more than $25,000 in damage—why risk it?

The Cost of Flooding

Flooding can be an emotionally and financially devastating event.  Without flood insurance, most residents have to pay out of pocket or take out loans to repair and replace damaged items.  With flood insurance, you're able to recover faster and more fully.  Use the tool below to see how much flood damage—even from just a few inches of water—could cost you.

 

Do You Need Flood Insurance?

Here are some important facts to keep in mind:

  • FACT: Homeowners and renters insurance does not typically cover flood damage.
  • FACT: More than 20 percent of flood claims come from properties outside high-risk flood zones.
  • FACT: Flood insurance can pay regardless of whether or not there is a Presidential Disaster Declaration.
  • FACT: Disaster assistance comes in two forms: a U.S. Small Business Administration loan, which must be paid back with interest, or a FEMA disaster grant, which is about $5,000 on average per household.  By comparison, the average flood insurance claim is nearly $30,000 and does not have to be repaid.
All About Flood Maps

The primary feature of flood maps are flood zones, which are geographic areas that FEMA has defined according to varying levels of flood risk and type of flooding. These zones are depicted on the published Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) or Flood Hazard Boundary Map (FHBM). Everyone lives in an area with some risk of flood—it’s just a question of whether you live in a low-, moderate-, or high-risk area.

To find your community’s flood map, visit the FEMA Flood Map Service Center, then type in your address and search. You may view, print and download flood maps, open an interactive flood map (if available), and view all products related to your community.

Find out if your community has pending or preliminary map changes underway. When your community’s flood map is updated to reflect the current risks where you live, requirements for flood insurance coverage and the costs of your policy can also change. Want to receive an alert when your community’s flood map changes? Sign upto receive email notifications when products are updated.

Get answers to your flood mapping questions online or by talking with someone from FEMA’s Flood Map Service Center.

How Can I Pay Less for My Flood Insurance?

What you pay for flood insurance often has a lot to do with how much flood risk is associated with your building. Mitigation and other factors play a role in protecting properties from flood damage, but sometimes they can also help reduce how much you pay for your flood insurance policy.

Did You Know?

 

An elevated home, like the one shown in 5 Ways to Lower Your Flood Insurance Premium with a first floor elevated three feet above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE), can expect to save 60% or more on annual flood insurance premiums. 

Does my community get a discount?

If your community is enrolled in the Community Rating System (CRS), you may be receiving a discount on your flood insurance. The discount is calculated based on the community's efforts to reduce the risk of flooding. If you have questions about CRS, call your insurance agent or insurer.

Are there ways to protect my property from flood damage?

 

The Homeowner’s Guide to Retrofitting can help you decide the right method to mitigate future damage and loss by considering various factors, such as hazards to your home, permit requirements, technical limitations and costs. This guide also helps you develop a flood protection strategy.

Elevation: is it the answer?

 

The Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage, for eligible properties that are required to be in compliance with local floodplain requirements, can help pay for elevating a building after a flood. Another way to get help with the cost of elevating your building would be through one of FEMA's various grant programs. The grants are administered by states, and each state decides which projects it will fund and for how much. Contact your local floodplain manager for more information.

If you would like to consider elevating your home, learn more about it to determine if it might be a good option. It can be very expensive, but can substantially reduce flood damage and could be a way to reduce the cost of your flood insurance. Here’s another helpful resource: Chapter Five in Homeowner’s Guide to Retrofitting.

I cannot elevate my property, so what can I do?

 

Reducing Flood Risk to Residential Buildings that Cannot be Elevated explains things that can be done to better protect a building from flood damage, and in some cases implementing these changes will reduce the cost of your flood insurance.

Source: Floodsmart.gov

National Preparedness Month: National Flood Insurance

9/11/2018 (Permalink)

Storm Damage National Preparedness Month: National Flood Insurance The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures.

The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners, renters and businesses and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.

For more information, visit www.FloodSmart.gov. Watch this short informative video, Why do I Need to Rethink Insurance?

This year (2018) the NFIP celebrates 50 years of protecting people in the United States against the perils of flood damage.

HURRICANES HARVEY AND IRMA NOTE: If you've been impacted by Hurricane Harvey, this page provides resources about how to File Your Flood Claim.

 

I Don't Have Flood Insurance--Why Do I Need It?

Use our interactive tool to find out how much a flood could cost you, and watch this short but informative video to learn more about the value of having flood insurance, Why do I Need to Rethink Insurance?

FACT: Floods are the nation’s most common and costly natural disaster and cause millions of dollars in damage every year.

FACT: Homeowners and renters insurance does not typically cover flood damage.

FACT: Floods can happen anywhere--More than 20 percent of flood claims come from properties outside the high risk flood zone. Check out The Big Cost of Flooding.

FACT: Flood insurance can pay regardless of whether or not there is a Presidential Disaster Declaration.

FACT: Most federal disaster assistance comes in the form of low-interest disaster loans from U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and you have to pay them back. FEMA offers disaster grants that don't need to be paid back, but this amount is often much less than what is needed to recover. A claim against your flood insurance policy could and often does, provide more funds for recovery than those you could qualify for from FEMA or the SBA--and you don't have to pay it back.

FACT: You may be required to have flood insurance. Congress has mandated federally regulated or insured lenders to require flood insurance on mortgaged properties that are located in areas at high risk of flooding. But even if your property is not in a high risk flood area, your mortgage lender may still require you to have flood insurance.

Flood insurance helps more: Check out your state's flood history with FEMA's interactive data visualization tool. Roll your cursor over each county to see how many flooding events have happened. The tool allows you to compare how much FEMA and the U.S. Small Business Administration have provided in terms of federal disaster aid after Presidential Disaster Declarations to the amount the National Flood Insurance program has paid to its policyholders. It's easy to see that having flood insurance provides a lot more help for recovery.

I Have Flood Insurance--Do I Really Need To Keep It?

You realize your flood insurance policy is about to expire and you’re on the fence about renewing: It hasn’t flooded in your area in years (or ever). And you really could use that extra money to buy something you really want. Watch this short, informative video, Why Do I Need to Rethink Insurance?

But wait!

DON’T. RISK. IT.

FACT: Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States, affecting every region and state, including yours.

FACT: Flood insurance can be the difference between recovering and being financially devastated.

FACT: The damage from just one inch of water can cost more than $20,000. Check out The Big Cost of Flooding.

FACT: You may be required to have flood insurance. Congress has mandated federally regulated or insured lenders to require flood insurance on mortgaged properties that are located in areas at high risk of flooding. But even if your property is not in a high-risk flood area, your mortgage lender may still require you to have flood insurance.

FACT: If you allow your flood insurance policy to lapse for either more than 90 days, or twice for any number of days, you may be required to provide an Elevation Certificate (if you don't have one), and you may no longer be eligible for policy rate discounts you might have been receiving prior to the policy lapse. It's important to talk with your insurance agent before canceling or not renewing the policy.

FACT: You can file a flood claim even if there is not a Presidential Disaster Declaration.

FACT: Flood damage is not typically covered by homeowners insurance.

FACT: No home is completely safe from potential flooding devastation—why risk it?

FACT: If you live in a high risk flood zone, and you've received federal disaster assistance in the form of grants from FEMA or low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) following a Presidential Disaster Declaration, you must maintain flood insurance in order to be considered for any future federal disaster aid.

FACT: Storms are not the only cause of floods. Flooding can be caused by dams or levees breaking, new development changing how water flows above and below ground, snowmelt and much more.

FACT: Too often, Americans are caught off guard by the emotional and financial costs of flood damage.

Flood insurance helps more: Check out your state's flood history with FEMA's interactive data Visualization Tool. Roll your cursor over each county to see how many flooding events have happened. The tool allows you to compare how much FEMA has provided in terms of federal disaster aid (through its Individuals & Households Program) after Presidential Disaster Declarations to the amount the National Flood Insurance Program has paid to its policyholders. It's easy to see having flood insurance provides a lot more help for recovery.

To renew your policy, call your flood insurance agent. If you don’t have your insurance agent’s contact information, call the National Flood Insurance Program’s Help Center at 1-800-427-4661.

Who Can Buy Flood Insurance?

If you are a renter or homeowner (residential policy); or business owner (non-residential policy) and your property is located in a NFIP-participating community, you can purchase a policy. Contact your insurance agent to find out if your community participates in the National Flood Insurance Program.

Flood insurance from the NFIP is only available in participating communities. Ask your agent if your state and community participate, or look it up online in the Community Status Book.

Learn more by watching these short videos, What Do I Need To Know About Flood Insurance Coverage? and How Can I Buy Flood Insurance?

How Can I Buy Flood Insurance?

Find an insurance agent near you. The agent who helps you with your homeowners or renters insurance may be able to help you with purchasing flood insurance too.

You can only purchase flood insurance through an insurance agent; you cannot buy it directly from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). If your insurance agent does not sell flood insurance, you can:

  • Contact the National Flood Insurance Program’s Help Center at 1-800-427-4661 to request an agent referral.
  • Watch this informative video, How Can I Buy Flood Insurance?

What Do I Need To Know When I Buy A Flood Insurance Policy?

How Do I Renew, Change Or Pay For My Flood Insurance Policy?

Your flood insurance agent can help you make changes to, pay for, or renew your flood policy. If your lender requires you to have flood insurance, contact them directly to ask questions about renewing or changing your policy. Your payments could be included in financial transactions associated with your mortgage.

My Question Is About Flood Maps--What Should I Do?

Find out if your community has a recent or upcoming flood map change. When your community’s  flood map is updated to reflect the current risks where you live, requirements for flood insurance coverage and the costs of your policy can also change.

Find your community’s flood map (Type in your address and choose "Interactive Map")

Get answers to your flood mapping questions online or by talking with someone from FEMA’s Map Service Center.

Request a review of your flood zone designation (If you believe the zone your insurer or lender has determined for your property is incorrect.)

What Should I Know And Do Before, During And After A Flood?

The National Flood Insurance Program Desk Reference is in three distinct sections:

  • Before the Flood
  • During the Flood, and
  • After the Flood

Community and state leaders, insurance industry professionals, as well as policyholders, renters, homeowners and businesses will find its resources helpful. We have organized this guide to provide succinct information in an easy-to-navigate document and included important, key contact information. To ensure it can be updated as the program evolves, this document has been published electronically.

Read about everything from mitigating your home to reduce flood damage, to information about weather alerts and how to stay safe when it's flooding in, How to Prepare for a Flood.

Information for Policyholders, Help with or without a Disaster Declaration.

My Home Or Business Just Flooded--What Should I Do?

File Your Flood Claim

Flood claim appeals and guidance (please note--you cannot appeal a claim until you receive a denial [for some or all of your claim amount] from your insurance company.)

What Can I Do To Prepare For Or Even Reduce Flood Damage? And Can Doing These Things Lessen How Much I Pay For Flood Insurance?

What you pay for flood insurance has a lot to do with how much flood risk is associated with your building. It makes sense to reduce flood risk no matter what, but in some instances reducing flood risk can also lead to lower flood insurance costs. Below are some resources to help, but discussing your policy options with your insurance agent is the best place to start.

Reducing Flood Risk to Residential Buildings that Cannot be Elevated explains things that can be done to better protect a building from flood damage, and in some cases implementing these changes will reduce the cost of your flood insurance.

Communities enrolled in the NFIP's Community Rating System can get discounts on their flood insurance, learn more here.

The Homeowner's Guide to Retrofitting can help you decide the right method to mitigate future damage and loss by considering various factors, such as hazards to your home, permit requirements, technical limitations, and costs. This guide also helps you develop a flood protection strategy.

The Increased Cost of Compliance (ICC) coverage, for eligible properties that are required to be in compliance with local floodplain requirements, can help pay for elevating a building after a flood. Another way to get help with the cost of elevating your building would be through one of FEMA's various grant programs. The grants are administered by states, and each state decides which projects it will fund and for how much. Contact your local floodplain manager for more information.

To learn more about elevating your property, read Elevating Your House.

Did you know? An elevated home, like the one shown on the 5 Ways to Lower Your Flood Insurance Premium, with a first floor elevated 3 feet above the base ­flood elevation, can expect to save 60 percent or more on annual ­flood insurance premiums.

Did you know? Elevating just one foot above the Base Flood Elevation often results in a 30% reduction in annual premiums.

Source: Ready.gov